Michigan Projectile Point Types

UPDATED 1/29/2000

     This page is an overview of many of the projectile point types that are found in the state of Michigan.  These points are also found throughout the Eastern United States. Still others such as fluted points used by Paleo-Indians (ca. 10,000 - 12,000 + years ago) are found across nearly the entire North American continent and even into South America.  For example Redstone Points, fluted points that are found in the central United States (i.e. Tennessee, Alabama, etc.).  (This page is in its infancy, please bear with me.  A complete introduction along with more images and their descriptions will be posted in the coming days/weeks/years as time permits.  Remember I am not a professional this page is only meant to be used as a reference when identifying your points.)

This site is under construction.  Please visit us again in the future.

IF ANYONE WOULD LIKE TO HELP OR IF YOU HAVE CORRECTIONS, ETC. PLEASE CONTACT DALE AT: HELP_ID_POINTS

(More images and  descriptions to come.)

Agate_Basin.jpg (34921 bytes)

Agate Basin Point

 

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Hi-LoPT.jpg (25842 bytes)

Hi-Lo Point

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KirkCornerNotched.jpg (30029 bytes)

Kirk Corner Notched Points

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BifurcatePT.jpg (16099 bytes)

Bifurcate Point

DESCRIPTION:  This point is very similar to the St. Albans Bifurcated Point of West Virginia which is a small bifurcated point.  The base is much broader then the locally found Lake Erie Bifurcate (see example below).  The tip of these points are commonly  very sharp and somewhat off center.  

SIZE:  The St. Albans Bifurcate Point averages from 1 to 2 inches in length.

AGE:  Early Archaic ca. 6,000 to 4,000 BC

 

Lake_Erie_Bi.jpg (15379 bytes)

Lake Erie Bifurcate Point

DESCRIPTION:  Small, thin, narrow bifurcated base projectile point.  Commonly produced from local chert sources such as Stony Creek Chert as is the example seen here. Stony Creek Chert is found in lime stone outcrops along Stony Creek in Monroe County, Michigan.  

SIZE:  Most examples found in Michigan vary in size from 1/2 to 3/4 inches some may be longer.

AGE:  (Late) Early Archaic ca. 6,000 to 4,000 BC

 

Normanskill_PT.jpg (26273 bytes)

Normanskill Point

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DustinPT.jpg (22136 bytes)

Dustin Point

(A.K.A. Lamoka, or Dustin-Lomaka Points)

DESCRIPTION:  A small, narrow, thick point, trianguloid in appearance with a central ridge running the entire length of the point.  These points can have either weak to moderate side notches, or straight stems with sloping shoulders.  These points are also characteristically two to three times as long as they are wide.

SIZE:  Length is from under 1 to 2 1/2 inches, average between 1 1/4 to 1 3/4 inches.  The average thickness for these points is in the 1/4 inch range.

AGE:  Associated with the Middle Archaic period in Michigan ca. 4,000 BC to 2,500 BC. 

GenessePT.jpg (54821 bytes)

Genesse Point

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HellgramitePTjpg.jpg (15258 bytes)

Hellgramite Point

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Adena.jpg (40117 bytes)

Adena Point

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MadisonPT.jpg (16931 bytes)

Madison Point

DESCRIPTION:  These points are small, thin triangular points.

SIZE:  Most of these points range in length  from 1/2 to 2 3/8 inches with their  average being about 1 inch. Thickness ranges from 1/6 to 3/8 inches.

AGE: This is a Late Woodland point and was utilized from ca. 500 - 1800 AD

 

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